tutorial

36 Days of Type on OpenCL & Blender Motion Graphics

So it's that time of year again! :) The 36 Days of Type are starting on the 21st of February and I fully intend to take apart again this year. Keep an eye out on my Instagram page once it gets started.

This year though, I wanted to set myself more of a challenge. As with last year, once I'm done the files will be made open to everyone after I clean them up a bit.
The big difference is that I'll be limiting myself somewhat by only using the OpenCL implementation of Cycles. This means I'll be missing some of the usual tricks and workflows I use.

So why do this? In the past, I've noticed that by limiting myself I tend to get more creative in the way I solve problems, whether that's in 3D or real life. By constraining what I can and can't use I'll have to re-think some of the techniques I use a lot (and sometimes overuse).
Add to that the fact that I'm a hardware nerd and want to see what a pair of AMD RX480's can do when it comes to Cycles. All of the HDR's and / or textures will be grabbed from the Blender Cloud so I can share all of the files in their original state. If you're a Blender Cloud subscriber and haven't tried the addon, I highly recommend having a look at it!


Then... Blender Motion Graphics?!
I recently visited the Blender Institute to discuss and finalize a course that I'll be creating in the next 6 weeks for the Blender Cloud that's all about... You guessed it, motion graphics in Blender.

The course will focus on a small project that I'll break down from start to finish, talking not only about the techniques used, but also the general workflow behind it. I find this approach to a course more interesting as it gives more insight on how to actually start a project and follow through with it until the end.

This will all be made available exclusively on the Blender Cloud once it's finished and is currently planned for release at the end of March. So be sure to check it out in a few weeks if you're interested.

Natron 101: A Practical Guide To Node-Based Compositing

Hi there,

This tutorial is all about the basics of node-based compositing. Rather than doing a ramble on the interface and explaining every button, I decided to work with a practical example. This way, you'll get a real-world project with the software to get you started quickly.

This tutorial is mainly meant for people who already have a little bit of experience with applications such as After Effects of Photoshop, and working with render passes.

The software used for this tutorial is Natron. Why Natron, you might ask? Well, the interface and shortcuts are very similar to Nuke, but Natron is open source and thus free. So it's a great way to get acquainted with a node-based workflow without spending money. You can also use it on commercial environment, so you're not limited to a student or personal learning edition.
Don't get me wrong, Nuke is a wonderful application to work with and even has a free learning edition with a few limitations. One of those limitations is that it's not meant for commercial work.

EDIT: The workfiles have been updates to work with Natron 2.0.

As always, enjoy the video and don't hesitate to ask me questions!

Corona 101: Hit the ground rendering

Hi there!

With the release of Corona 1.0 recently, I wanted to make some videos for new users to get acquainted with it. There's 3 videos which talk about material creation, basic lighting and render settings respectively.

I've been using Corona since one of the first alpha builds and it's been my main renderer for over a year now, with most of the work on my blog being created with it. As I mention in the videos, this is just my opinion on why I like using it. There's no need to start a discussion about which renderer is better, because it all comes down to the workflow you like to use.

That's why these videos are intended for people who are new to Corona to have a look at, outlining basic usage.

If you're interested in trying it out for yourself, you've got two options:

- A free fully functional 45-day trial: No watermarks, no resolution limit and you can even use it for commercial work.

- Corona Alpha 6: This version works up to 3ds Max 2014 and will remain free forever. Even though it's an alpha version, it's very capable.

Check out the Corona website for more info.

If you're looking for more, the Corona documentation also has some great resources. Because it's a very community driven project, posting in the forum is also a great way to ask questions.

Enjoy the videos!

EDIT 12/03: Now in stereo! Audio has been fixed. :)

Spanish Tutorial using the Grass Generator

Alejandro Valverde has made a great tutorial showcasing all the Grass Generator features in spanish. He's using Vray to create the final image, so it's more than just an overview of the settings.
Big thanks to him for taking the time to do this! Be sure to check out his YouTube channel as well. I'll be making a english overview myself once a new release is ready, at this point I don't feel the need to do one just yet.