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All 36 Days of Type files now available!

The 2017 36 Days of Type are over, so I'm releasing all the files for download! You can find them over on the resources page.
Being the second time I took part, this year has been interesting to compare with last year's series. I was even featured, which was rad. :)

Where, in 2016, they marked my transition over to Blender full time from commercial software, this year it was OpenCL's time to shine. In the month and a half that took to create them, significant changes were made to the Cycles OpenCL implementation. Just a quick look at the Blender Release Notes for 2.79 (at the time of writing) shows the amount of stuff going on.

  • The amount of work that the compute device does at once is now determined automatically to fill available memory, independent of tile size. This reduces render times by up to 50% in certain cases, without the need to adjust the tile size for every scene or system configuration. (230c00d)
  • Tiles can now be seen updating while rendering. (230c00d)
  • Fixed shading artifacts sometimes seen especially at low samples. (223f458)
  • Fixes for most common cases of hanging and crashing. (365a423)
  • Added support of SSS and Volume rendering (57e2662)
  • Optimized transparent shadows (e8b5a5b)

As always, these features aren't guaranteed, but usually they're a good indication of what's to come. Throughout the project, I was excited to work on a number of posts with the daily builds seeing Blender improve every day. Things like this keep me investing time and energy in improving my FOSS pipeline.

I also had the chance to sit down with my brother Robin Sinnaeve for a collab on the 0 and 1, which was a lot of fun. Thanks bro! #binarybros

As with last year, I would recommend taking part next year, even if you only do one. It's great seeing so many takes on the same subject, day after day. And a big thanks to everyone for the enthusiasm!

36 Days of Type on OpenCL & Blender Motion Graphics

So it's that time of year again! :) The 36 Days of Type are starting on the 21st of February and I fully intend to take apart again this year. Keep an eye out on my Instagram page once it gets started.

This year though, I wanted to set myself more of a challenge. As with last year, once I'm done the files will be made open to everyone after I clean them up a bit.
The big difference is that I'll be limiting myself somewhat by only using the OpenCL implementation of Cycles. This means I'll be missing some of the usual tricks and workflows I use.

So why do this? In the past, I've noticed that by limiting myself I tend to get more creative in the way I solve problems, whether that's in 3D or real life. By constraining what I can and can't use I'll have to re-think some of the techniques I use a lot (and sometimes overuse).
Add to that the fact that I'm a hardware nerd and want to see what a pair of AMD RX480's can do when it comes to Cycles. All of the HDR's and / or textures will be grabbed from the Blender Cloud so I can share all of the files in their original state. If you're a Blender Cloud subscriber and haven't tried the addon, I highly recommend having a look at it!


Then... Blender Motion Graphics?!
I recently visited the Blender Institute to discuss and finalize a course that I'll be creating in the next 6 weeks for the Blender Cloud that's all about... You guessed it, motion graphics in Blender.

The course will focus on a small project that I'll break down from start to finish, talking not only about the techniques used, but also the general workflow behind it. I find this approach to a course more interesting as it gives more insight on how to actually start a project and follow through with it until the end.

This will all be made available exclusively on the Blender Cloud once it's finished and is currently planned for release at the end of March. So be sure to check it out in a few weeks if you're interested.